| Real Life Strategies for Building Wealth

cashflow

Ha! I know this sound rather odd; but it seems that I have given birth to a (potential) financial genius.

We have not been able to take a game of Cash Flow off our soon to be thirteen years old son for the last year or so; and we have been playing regularly. We also remember the time when one of us used to win.

At first our son lost repeatedly; he couldn’t understand all this stuff about buying shares , small deals, big deals, doodads, markets and, generally, paying for stuff.

Then he started learning. One thing he learned is that if you are less qualified you earn much less but also spend less (in the game, of course); in gaming terms, this means that if you play it smart you can get out of the rat race – to have passive income higher than your expenses – fast(er).

After that he learned that when you don’t have much capital – not enough even for very small deals – there are two winning strategies: reduce expenses and buy shares in the hope you’ll score big.

More recently he’s been figuring out the winning strategies for big earners – the other evening he won a game where he was a lawyer with astronomical expenses and a decent cash flow.

Mostly he’s learned that having children early hurts your chances to win the wealth game; that divorce hurts not only your emotions but also bruises your bank account; and that one is better being straight with the tax authorities.

Now he wins almost every time we play; luck only changes the speed with which he wins.

I’ve been seriously considering asking his opinion about our investment plans and the strategy to make £2.5 ($4) million in five years time. Should I do that? At least I wouldn’t have to pay him for opinion; advice is another matter altogether.

Now let me tell you about the personal finance posts that made me think during these last couple of weeks.

Just when I was thinking that I can’t possibly add another ‘put life on ice and retire early’ blog to my reading list, I find myself visiting JohnnyMoneyseed.com with alarming regularity: never been able to resist the combination of intelligence, conviction and clarity of purpose. Want an example of that? Go read his post on the 17 Things That Will Push You From Middle Class to First Class. What a gem! I may not agree with all (including the frugality and tax hacking) but this post surely made me think! And thinking is good.

For some time now I’ve suspected a case of acute mid-life crisis. You know, the thing where you get up in the morning and can’t face another day of your life! When you don’t want your life, and you job, to be a marriage of convenience and comfort; you yearn for excitement and change. Reading Robert’s article on the MoneyBulldog about the 5 signs that one is in the wrong job made me think that I may not be having a mid-life crisis.

I really loved this one: Ashley at TheFrugalModel published saving advice from her grandma that rocks! But the reason I loved it so much was that it made me think that financial security and predictability was but a short bleep in the long history of humanity.

Kurt at the MoneyCounselor published interesting data on the biggest money stressors. Top of the list are ‘saving for retirement’ and ‘lack of savings’. Which seems to be the situation almost everywhere. And you know what I think: it may be time to stop worrying about it and start doing something.

There are other posts worth mentioning but these are the top ones.

How has The Money Principle been doing?

Well, we hosted our first carnival – Carnival of Financial Planning – and if you haven’t checked it out yet please do. Interesting articles there.

I was also interviewed by Craig for Money Superstar; if you would like to read the interview you can find it here. Apart from reading what I had to say, please note that I was referred to as ‘delightful’ which beats ‘distinguished’ any time :).

Apart from that we were included in the following personal finance carnivals:

Carn Financial Independence at Frugal Rules
Fin. Carn. for Young Adults at Financial Nerd
Carn. of Financial Planning at Planting Our Pennies
Carn. of Fin. Camaraderie at Hurricanes, Panties
Lifestyle Carnival at Drop the Cookies
Carnival of Retirement at This That and the MBA
Carn of MoneyPros at Money Pros

Carn. of Financial Planning at Tie the Money Knot
Carn Financial Independence at Carnival of Financial Independence
Carn of MoneyPros at The Frugal Toad
Carn. of Fin. Camaraderie at Digital Personal Finance
Aspiring Blogger Fin. Carnival at Aspiring Blogger

For this we are grateful!

Have you seen our new ‘About’ page? Please have a look and let me know what you think; I really want to make it better.

This is all for now; speak soon.

photo credit: svet via photopin cc