Happy Easter from The Money Principle

Easter eggs Happy Easter from The Money Principle

I am culturally Christian Orthodox and practically agnostic.

You know, I belong to the branch of Christianity where people know how to celebrate, have fun, even indulge in the occasional excess and not be racked by guilt afterwards.

I also come from one of the countries in the former Soviet Bloc where religious celebration was discouraged (to say the least).

Still, when my sister said that we haven’t had coloured eggs for Easter, I told her that she may not have had them but I did: after all I was raised by my grandmother.

Now, my Baba (grandmother) and God had a very unhealthy relationship: she tested him during World War II and found him wanting. For thirty five years she never mentioned him and never went to church; she had no icons, no crosses no nothing. She believed in the power of land and gold.

Still Baba coloured eggs, made Easter bread and roasted lamb every year.

Chocolate eggs don’t do it for me; I still have to have hard boiled coloured eggs for Easter.

This is what I did today – coloured a dozen eggs. I also made the traditional sweet bread we have for Easter.

kozunak Happy Easter from The Money Principle

I case you are wondering, we share it we the Greeks and they call it Tsoureki; we Bulgarians call it Kozunak.

Follow the link(s) to get to recipes that can be made in a bread-maker. Also, you don’t have to put raisings in the Bulgarian recipe. You still have time to make it and it is pure high calorie indulgence – chocolate has nothing on this sweet bread.

We have everything:

  • The eggs are ready (see picture);
  • The Kozunak has been made ready for tomorrow (mine doesn’t look as good but tastes divine);
  • A leg of lamb is in the fridge ready to be roasted tomorrow;
  • Grown up sons have been invited to lunch.

Happy Easter!

photo credit: kulinarno via photopin cc

4 thoughts on “Happy Easter from The Money Principle”

  1. Happy Easter. Funny how all holidays are about food. Of course friends and family, but you have to have food too. We share food with with family and friends and it makes a very joyous occasion.

  2. Happy (late) Easter! That bread looks delicious. Despite my family’s agnostic roots, we still celebrate Easter because we all have an affinity for getting together and celebrating anything – especially when there is food involved!

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